NIC-ICTU Biennial Conference, City Hotel L’Derry, 11-12 April 2018

5 Apr 2018

Publication cover - NIC-ICTU BDC 18 Report Agenda low res

 

The Northern Ireland Committee of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions (NIC-ICTU) is hosting its Biennial Delegate Conference (BDC) next week in the City Hotel in L’Derry. The conference will run on 11th and 12th April and will be attended by 250 delegates from the 24 trade unions and ten Trades Councils affiliated to Congress in Northern Ireland.

 

The Northern Ireland Committee (NIC) of the ICTU is the representative body for 24 trade unions with over 200,000 members across Northern Ireland.  In membership terms, it is the largest civil society organisation in Northern Ireland.

 

 

The conference will debate 38 motions covering a comprehensive agenda of issues relevant to all workers and their families in Northern Ireland. Naturally, the conference will have as a common thread its Better Work Better Lives Campaign ( https://www.betterworkbetterlives.org/ ), which promotes decent work, fair pay and real investment for all workers across Northern Ireland.

 

The conference will be addressed by senior trade union figures, and there should be an especially stimulating guest contribution from Patricia King, General Secretary of the ICTU, the leader of the trade union movement on the island of Ireland.

 

Other guest speakers will include the General Secretary of the Scottish TUC, Grahame Smith, and Mike Jenkins, President of the Wales TUC.

 

The Biennial Delegate Conference will be chaired by Maria Morgan, the culmination of his duties as chair of NIC-ICTU since 2016.

 

Speaking ahead of the BDC, ICTU Assistant General Secretary Owen Reidy said: “Representatives of workers in every sector of the Northern Ireland economy, public and private, will come together to reaffirm our commitment to a Better Work Better Lives for all.  Issues such low pay, and the loss of good quality jobs in manufacturing and investment in public services will impact upon the lives of all working people and their families. The trade union movement is unified in its determination to achieve decent wages for quality jobs, promote real investment in public services and gain support for these objectives through a forum on Social Dialogue. Such a collaborative approach is common and successful across most European countries, and has been an effective part of devolved governance in Wales – there is no reason why it could not be a useful means of developing policy in Northern Ireland, regardless of whether Stormont is functioning as fully  as we would all like to see.”

 

The conference, which sets common policy goals for Northern Ireland’s trade union movement for the next two years, will discuss and vote upon motions on topics of significant interest to all working people including:

  • Brexit
  • The political impasse at Stormont
  • Defending the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement
  • Harassment in the workplace and other equality matters
  • Developing an industrial strategy
  • Celebrating the NHS on its 70th anniversary
  • Gaining real terms pay rises for working families
  • The policy priorities of the Better Work Better Lives Campaign

 

The full agenda with motions can be viewed at:

https://www.ictuni.org/publications/nicictu-bdc-18-report-agenda-low-res/